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In absence of an answer of David Arno, who first emitted the hypothese, here a summary of the findings. It appears that the first programming language that offered underscores as digit separator in numeric literals was ADA. No evidence of a prior use in another language was found. Its use in ADA & historical evidence In the paper *The rationale of ...


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CSS is (by accident) a Turing complete language. That feature makes it a DSL. You might also look into DSSSL, which is a dialect of Scheme to manipulate SGML documents, and is an interesting DSL. I don't mention DSL in my resume, except when claiming to be a DSL designer and implementor. You could mention several DSLs in your resume, as an indication ...


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Domain Specific Languages are languages created to support a particular set of tasks, as they are performed in a specific domain. The Cascading Style Sheet language defines the style to use to visualize a document. We can use it to define how an HTML document will appear on the screen or how it will appear when printed.So css is used to perform Specific ...


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There are a couple factors: whether the language has support for embedding API. Some scripting languages like Python and Lua has officially supported APIs specifically designed to embed those languages into a host application. This includes specifying how the language interacts with foreign function interface, foreign object handles, foreign classes, etc ...


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Embedding a language (I'll avoid characterizing it as "scripting") means that the following has been done: The interpreter and runtime are running in the same process as the host application Enough of the standard types and the standard library are also available from within that runtime Most times, the application has its own library available to the host ...


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In theory any language can be embedded. If there are no constraints on the solution, it is actually the case. It's natural consequence of Turing completeness i.e. you can always build an emulator. What I think you are asking is "what makes a language practical for this purpose?" I think one of the main things that makes a language a good choice for this ...


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The main factor is typically the API that's used by host applications to access the language libraries. Languages like Lua are designed to be easily 'connected to' from host applications. The language may be available in library form, the API easily callable from other languages (generally a plain C API). The API usually provides functions to run a script,...


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I think this is an interesting question, that not many people are aware of even asking. From a general software perspective, I like to see it as follows: Behaviour drives state, and state can potentially drive behaviour It is a two-way relationship, because certain actions can trigger certain flows to be executed, while within some flows, certain actions ...


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Behaviour is decisions being made. State is decisions being remembered. When OOP people talk about behaviour what they mean is the gooey sticky part of the code base that has to be changed every time a business rule changes. Rather than state what this is usually contrasted with is dry structural cerimonial code that exists mostly because the system or ...


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There are multiple layers to the answer. On the technical level, state is simply the instance variables of an object, and behavior are the methods. Both of these can be extended to other granularity units, like a group of objects or the whole system. Should be clear from the context. On the semantic ("meaning") level, specifically for object-orientation, ...


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Java supported unicode in identifiers from its first release (1996). See The Java Language Specification 1.0: http://titanium.cs.berkeley.edu/doc/java-langspec-1.0/3.doc.html#40625 : Letters and digits may be drawn from the entire Unicode character set, which supports most writing scripts in use in the world today, including the large sets for Chinese,...


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In my opinion syntactic expression (be it imperative or functional) is almost pure coincidence wrt "what" and "how". While I can see some analogy with mathematical equations (an equation to be solved is "what" and solution of the equation is "how"): In common sense people understand it, "what" is nearer the problem and "how" is nearer the solution, the "what"...


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Perl’s 1990s Unicode Support in Function Names I can’t say that Perl was “the first” programming language to allow Unicode in function names — this seems unlikely to me — but I can definitively document when it first began to do so. First Repository Commit: 834a4ddd8309fbf6aabbbc51bb6fcbe056e7963f on 1998-10-23 It was in this commit from 1998 that Larry ...


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In functional programming, the "how" is "evaluate this expression" instead of "execute this sequence of steps." As programmers, we can pretty much automatically translate expressions into sequences of steps to evaluate them in our minds, so the distinction isn't always very clear. Also, FP expressions often resemble sequences of statements. I find that ...


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Isn't above code snippet is just different way of saying "how to solve" problem ? Yes. In the end, computer science is invariably about computing so you're always talking about "how to solve" a problem. But if you read the functional example a certain way: Len :: [Int] -> Int Len [] = 0 Len [x:xs] = 1 + Len(xs) "Length is a function that takes a list ...


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