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1

Semantic versioning isn't applicable. A website is generally only available in one version at a time, and if readers need to refer to an old version they will do it by date, e.g. "softwareengineering.stackexchange.com as it appeared on 18 September 2019", so the audience of a website generally has no reason to be interested in a version number. The OP didn'...


2

SemVer is defined for public APIs only. If your development does not define such an API, you'll first have to interpret SemVer to clarify its use for software without public API or other forms of content. You should not restart your versioning from 1.0.0: for practical reasons, in order to avoid the risk of any confusion with version 1, 10 and 100. ...


2

Choosing which number to start is the easiest part of switching to semantic versioning. Maintaining a semantic version number is a significant investment. Simple versioning makes no promises that any upgrade won't introduce breaking changes, semantic versioning does imply that minor version can be upgraded without breaking changes. This means you must spend ...


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I suggest conceptually re-interpereting the existing version numbers 1,2,3,...,134,135 as semver versions 1.0.0, 2.0.0, 3.0.0... 134.0.0, 135.0.0 Then just follow the rules of semver to decide how to number the next release - 136.0.0 if it may have a breaking change, 135.1.0 if it may contain new functionality, or 135.0.1 if it has no changes other than ...


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