New answers tagged

1

As the other answers said, UML is not a methodology, but a support for steps in a methodology. I found this classification useful to see how and where diagrams can fit in: Since behavior also describes software from the user's perspective, those diagrams can also be used to model the external view of software (although I don't think I've ever seen someone ...


0

I totally agree with others here - UML is not a process. You need process and notation, and UML is a tool for the second. Gathering requirements can be as agile and iterative as building the code. The Use Case diagrams are a very high level summary. Behind each ellipse there are a number of scenarios. If you know the overall goal, you probably can ...


0

What is this approach? Taking use-cases as basis to identify classes, as you describe, is typical of the Entity-Control-Boundary approach. It's not UML but rooted in the use-case driven software development methodologies such as: Objectory: promoted by Ivar Jacobson, the inventor of use-cases. Rational Unified Process: Rational hired Jacobson and the ...


1

If you're doing "object oriented analysis and design", then it makes sense to do the analysis before the design. That would suggest developing use cases first, and sketching them out, before attempting to identify classes. Use cases really only need the actors and the primary systems in your design. After that, and knowing what the system is ...


6

Bart van Ingen Schenau's answer is right in that UML is just a language and not a methodology. However, there are some methodologies that are built around tools (including UML), such as the Rational Unified Process. Different UML diagrams are used throughout the different phases of RUP. It's not really possible to specifically say how you can fit graphical ...


10

UML is just a language to draw pretty pictures with some chance that others understand what the shapes mean without an extensive explanation from you. UML does not tell you which diagrams to use in your analysis and design of a system, nor in which order diagrams should, or even can, be used. Which diagrams to use depends mostly on the information you want ...


0

Consider Simon Brown's C4 model. In summary (from Wikipedia), Context diagrams (level 1): they show the system in scope and its relationship with users and other systems; Container diagrams (level 2): they decompose a system into interrelated containers. A container represents an application or a data store; Component diagrams (level 3): they ...


2

First of all, your diagram does not correspond to the narrative: In your diagram, Person inherits from Person2. So Person2 would be an anonymous person without any name. Not very useful. To letPerson2 inherit from Person (in UML-speak we say that Person2 is a specialization of Person), you must have the triangle arrow head on the side of Person. Note that ...


Top 50 recent answers are included