New answers tagged

0

You should do what's right for your object design. The web api doesn't care about inheritance, it produces JSON containing a bunch of fields (or XML). If the fields are part of the same class or a parent class doesn't change the JSON. Hence you can change the service code at your leisure...


0

Assuming you have one client app running on 1000s of clients, making 750 million requests in total of 5 KB each. Let's say so that we have numbers, you have 25,000 client devices making 30,000 requests per week of 5KB each. Change if the numbers are different. The first cost is the cost for the clients, which is a bit tricky. You transfer 150 MB per client ...


1

To make such a calculation, you start by making a list of cost factors and find out the weekly costs for each of them: costs for your networking provider the hardware (renting price, or purchasing price divided by deprecation period, broken down to a price/week), including backup systems, backup storage systems etc. costs for any software required to run ...


4

It is a relevant question when hosting on cloud which may be the reason behind the question. There it is normal for each service have a price table e.g $ 0.05 for 1000 requests or something like that. If you are hosting on-prem the answer is amortized between the hardware. The people maintaining the hardware and the internet connection. In other words: if ...


0

Note that you don't need to (see RFC 7320 section 2.4) use the standard form data format (with & and =) (see the URL Standard section 5) for the query string, you can just make up a format as long as it only uses allowable characters (letters, numbers, -, ., _, ~, !, $, &, ', (, ), *, +, ,, ;, =, :, @, /, and ? (see RFC 3986)).


1

I went through almost the same analysis with a former coworker. He was adding a new API endpoint and wanted to pass in a complex JSON object into the query string instead of separate parameters. Like yourself, I had reservations. Exactly what the pros and cons are will depend on your specific product needs, architecture, team structure, and other factors. ...


4

What's bad is passing massive amounts of data in the URI, so a POST would be better in my opinion. Because of possible limitiations in size, because of problems passing arbitrary data, because of security concerns. That's of course a simple change. You generate the JSON, then you decide how to send it. Check with the database guys that it is not difficult ...


15

Its not a brilliant idea. The URI is not really a good place for data of unpredictable length, and although there is no 'official' maximum length, many webservers apply their own limit (IIS is 2083 characters, for example). Some webservers also have restrictions on acceptable characters in URIs. There are also other considerations that are generic to URIs. ...


0

If you are dealing with HR Human Resources move to ES CQRS pattern. HR is inherently event-based, "standard" object model just won't fit. Say an employee requested holidays, HR accepted, the employee requested a change, HR accepted, HR requested to cancel a part of holidays, the employee accepted. The holiday "account" in this case is an aggregate of all the ...


Top 50 recent answers are included