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When you look at the most highly scalable web applications (or services) today, the problem wasn't ensuring enough threads that were available, but ensuring the whole system could handle the concurrent web connections required to service the endpoints. The biggest advancements in concurrent requests/second on one installation came from non-blocking I/O. ...


4

You can keep updated data in a memory cache (such as REDIS) on the server side that is flushed into the database less frequently. But the general rule of thumb for optimization is that you don't do it before you: clearly see that there is a performance problem, either by experience or by calculations based on hard data and reasonable assumptions about ...


3

The backend person might have omitted their valid justifications Back-end person claims that front-end should to have two calls. First to authenticate user (login process) with JWT response only then second to authorize to retrieve user permissions, role(s) and user data. At face value, there's little reason to split a single workload into two network ...


1

To add to Berin's answer: Adding more threads to the application beyond the number of CPUs (you can have more than one CPU per core) will only help performance in the case that your application performance is not CPU-bound. Most web applications are IO-bound which makes adding threads a viable strategy in this space. However, there's also thread switching ...


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