Hot answers tagged

32

Yes, pretty much. With the "cloud" (as in "cloud providers"), you are renting the diskspace, bandwidth, CPU and memory owned by the provider and the means to use them from your software. They give you the infrastructure and you don't own the hardware. There are other forms of cloud computing that don't involve these providers, where you (the organisation) ...


12

Is unanswerable, except to say it depends. There are a lot of factors which will determine which approach is going to be the best in your case, e.g.: Is it normal for created objects to be retrieved shortly after they are created? What's the ratio of updates to accesses? Re. deciding you need a cache: If you're optimising without data then yes, it's ...


12

The "we don't have the resources" line is a red flag to me. You're either going to pay to do it right, or you'll have to pay for doing it wrong. I know which I'd pick. While your use case is fairly broad, which makes it hard to give you a simple answer, I would strongly recommend against giving each application rights to the database directly. A better ...


11

It contains a packaged version of your project. I found a blog entry mentioning it. Before an Azure package can be deployed to the emulator it must first be packaged. Since v1.4 of the Windows Azure Tools, the csx folder and its contents are no longer generated during compilation... So in order to force the generation of the csx folder we need to specify ...


9

Yes, anyone can easily find the key. The simplest method would be to use the .net development tools (available for free download from Microsoft) which contains a decompiler. Aim the decompiler at the program and look for any strings, not to many will look like keys... If that fails because you were a smart cookie and encrypted the key. They could still ...


8

Cloud computing says absolutely nothing about who owns the resources. Cloud computing is an architecture for developing distributed, network-based applications. There are a number of cloud computing service providers out there, such as Azure Services Platform, Amazon Web Services, Google App Engine, and a number of others. However, using someone else's ...


6

There is no way to guarantee that no data is ever lost. There are ways to diminish the chance, and there are ways to detect when the data is lost -- and this is the best you can do. Given this premise, a TCP connection is actually pretty good in this regard, as it guarantees delivery of a message or a failure. The question then boils down to: what do you ...


5

No. Cloud computing is not merely a way to rent resources. Cloud is all about services that: are delivered over the network (possibly the Internet) are fully controlled by API are fully automatable and automated require no human interaction for control are delivered as a commodity are billed like a utility: for measured usage require no capital expenditure ...


5

I would go with Option 2.. You most certainly don't need a dedicated SQL Server machine for each client, you don't even need and dedicated Instance. I don't know you think that is the case. My primary reason for this is that when the time comes that you want to scale horizontally (more servers) this is going to best position you to do that. I don't ...


5

Storing images is one of the classic use cases of Blob Storage. You can configure a Web Job to kick off each time an image is uploaded for any processing you may need to do (resize, generate a thumbnail, etc). You can also serve up the images right from blob storage - just store the image URL in your db. No need to serialize the images or have them pass ...


5

Since I don't know everything about your usage, I cannot say what is the correct way for you. What I can tell you is that mixing elastic with another DB is a legitimate and common course of action. You can use elasticsearch as your main (or only) storage if you'll invest the time needed. You can also only index your requested fields in elasticsearch (...


4

Since this is a static site, I recommend deploying your site in Azure Storage optionally adding CDN. There is a guide for static sites on Azure Storage here, and there is a guide for hooking up CDN to your storage here. The benefits are: Very reliable. Has the same SLAs as Azure Storage Very low maintenance. Lower maintenance than the three options you ...


4

I did something similar once, except I built and referenced a class library from a Function App. You should be able to adapt this approach: Build the solution Add a "Copy Files" task to copy the output of the class library into the references of the function app In the Copy Files task, specify the build output of the class library For the Target Folder, ...


4

Taking your example of AWS, it can indeed manage the entire deployment process, including deploying the full environment from Cloud Formation config files through to the source code of the application. Code is pushed to git in Code Commit and then code pipelines will build the environment, compile the code, run integration tests and allow everything to be ...


3

There is no one "correct" way to do anything in programming, even with a cloud-computing specific architecture such as Windows Azure. A cursory search of the MSDN documentation reveals that Azure does in fact have some useful functionality to help you separate your client's data. It appears as if you could decide to give each client their own SQL server ...


3

/waves hand.. These are not the tools you seek. You are looking for continuous integration. Although CI has the word continuous in there, it does not mean "all the time, every checkin". It can easily refer only to those bits you want to release - -and the way to tell the system which bits you want released is to merge them to a Releases branch. If you do ...


3

There is some information in e-book format (English and other languages) located here: E-Book Gallery for Microsoft Technologies Download content for ASP.NET, Office, SQL Server, Windows Azure, SharePoint Server and other Microsoft technologies in e-book formats. Reference, guide, and step-by-step information are all available. All the e-books are free. ...


3

As far as i know, is also called transact-sql. Is the same language, just with different features. But i also think they should give a different name like transact-azure or something like that. ;)


3

While it's hyped as something new, cloud computing really a new marketing twist on the time-sharing distributed computing model emerged in the mid-to-late 1960's. Of course, there are huge technical improvements but, when you look at it closely, it's not too much different from hooking up to a mainframe via an acoustic coupler and a teletype terminal to ...


3

It depends on a lot of things (It'd be pretty hard to compare the two, but I'm sure someone who has enough time could find the real answer). However, all things being equal as far as total throughput of the two separate VS the combined, the extra instance option will give you some nice benefits: Theoretically, it gives you a higher chance that your ...


3

I don't think they necessarily relate at all. DDD is about designing software from a business domain perspective, utilizing an ubiquitous language that you and your customer both understand. Many software developers mistake it for a programming technique, but it's more of a way to organize potential software structures (i.e. classes) around business domain ...


3

There are couple optimizations that can be done: After retrieving the images from the blobs, cache it into memory, depending on hit frequency. If the amount of images is very important, consider using redis as a L2 cache provider (now available on Azure). If the web server has to support a massive amount of hits, and the images can be publicly available, I ...


3

I wouldn't worry about misusing the pattern but in the scenarios you describe I don't think you need it. PubSub seems to be the popular default at the moment for any messaging application but there is a simpler version of it for when you don't need to fan out or fan in the messages. Just use messaging. There are different forms:, http, rpc, MQ, callbacks....


3

I don't think nservicebus has the support right now for what you are looking for. Using the azure servicebus broker would be just as unreliable as your network connection, so that is no solution. What you would need is a locally stored outbox (not to be confused with nsb's current outbox feature) + some kind of failure proof pump that pushes the messages ...


3

If you're going to sync against your master SQL database you will always have the same problem: how do you resolve conflicting changes? CouchDB doesn't help you there. It explicitly does not handle conflicts and leaves it up the user to handle them (by picking sides). Other solutions also can't really help you, because to resolve a conflict you must ...


3

Of course you can scale databases. Also, with a strict interpretation of monolith and microservice there generally shouldnt be this kind of performance scaling advantage to microservices. A monolith can be just all the microservices in one big package. It sounds to me like this person is using the term 'monolith' to imply a solution which is very tied to ...


2

you can use performance tools that generate requests to the server and measure the response time, server resources etc. I've used HP's performance center & VUGen in the past, and it worked well for me.


2

Your idea is a step in the right direction. Unless the data absolutely has to be presented in real time, you should always do the crawling via a background service and display the most recent data from the database (or even better, a cache). How you implement that service is entirely up to you, though. Some recommendations: Use a background process or ...


2

memcached manages objects with its own policy, which cached object would expire if no one accesses it or the memcached run out of memory. Therefore, your first approach is not a good idea as your object in memcached would keep being invalidated due to out-of-memory when you are creating objects. Q1. Approach 2 would be better in terms of performance ...


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