New answers tagged

1

1 course has many rooms 1 room has many courses 1 course has many sections 1 section has 1 course (? Or can the same section appear in multiple courses?) If a section always occurs in a particular room for a particular course, then it depends on the course-room entity that decomposes the many:many relationship between courses and rooms. This thus ...


5

Foreign key mapping is a proven technique for implementing a one-to-many relationship (not mandatory, i.e. 1 - 0..*). So having a foreign key in shipment_data that refers to shipment's primary key shipment.id would allow no, one, or many shipment_data for a specific shipment. Using the foreign key as a primary key is possible. It requires you to first ...


4

I've shied away from Access because my team is not comfortable using SQL and overall dislike the Access Interface. Here's your answer. There is a strong argument to use Excel because it is what your team is comfortable with, and that is pretty darned valuable. But managing multiple workbooks (with changing names) has already created several version ...


2

The datamodel is (mostly) independent of the database. Excel is not a database. Ms Access is a great RAD (rapid app devel) frontend, but db (MDAC/Jet) is limited on multiuser, security and backup (no dumps, binary log, etc), but fast and no db-server needed! You can work with Excel, but fetch data from a db (company enviroment Sql Server, MySql, Postgre ...


1

Another option is to use a database trigger to calculate the average review score when a new review is added by a user, and store that calculated value in a column in your cities table. This way the score only needs to be calculated when the reviews for a city change, and will always be up to date, and its handled directly by the database rather than your ...


2

In this case: Add a column “number of reviews” and a column “sum of reviews”. Then when a review is added, it’s a trivial change to the cities database that doesn’t require reading all the reviews for the city. Just add 1 to the count and the score to the sum of scores. And calculating the average is a single division.


2

There are a lot of trade-offs in dealing with files in a database. Due to some practical constraints database manufacturers provide a means of storing the files outside the database file structure to speed up the ability to transfer the file to the client. Oracle has DBFS, Microsoft has FileStreams, FileTable, and Remote Blob Store (RBS). The rough trade-...


Top 50 recent answers are included